Three benefits of working with an animal communicator

Are you listening to your animal friend
Are you listening? Working with an animal communicator lets your animal friend know that you are. (Image by Päivi Nietosvaara from Pixabay

You want to solve a puzzling behavioral problem with your dog. You want to help your cat through your upcoming move or divorce. You want to know what your horse needs from you as the end of his life approaches. Any of these situations, and countless others, may have you wondering if an animal communicator could help you sort it out.

Maybe you have doubts about animal communication. That’s OK. Maybe you’re not sure where to start — also OK. For now, consider three ways working with an animal communicator could help you and your animal friend find peace of mind.

1. Animals love that you’re listening.

In most if not all of the animal communication sessions I do, the animal appreciates being heard. This is especially true of rescued animals who have had little or no say in what happens to them. If they’ve experienced trauma, the notion that they have a choice about anything (including whether to communicate with me) may be new. Animal communication can therefore open new avenues of trust and partnership.

Working with an animal communicator can also help your animal hear you. Anyone who has ever had a human child, or been one, knows that what you hear from someone besides your primary caregiver sometimes sinks in more readily.

Of course you have been trying to listen to and help your animal. You’re probably doing better than you think. But there are so many of us humans on this planet, and we all have different skills and perspectives. We’ll all do better if we help each other out.

2. You get another set of eyes.

Years ago, I tied myself in knots trying to help my cat Idgie with a variety of health problems and changes. Even though I’d begun studying and working in animal communication myself, I knew I needed another perspective.

So I booked a session with my animal communication teacher, who helped me see aspects of the situation I had not. She also suggested action steps to help both Idgie and myself. That, along with continued veterinary care, helped get us on the right track.

An animal communicator brings a fresh perspective to your situation. Even if I’ve worked with an animal and/or family before, every session brings something new.

An animal communicator can be part of your pet’s team: you, your family, your pet sitter, your vet, your trainer, the folks at the specialty pet food store, the farrier, the groomer, the bodyworker, and more. I’m blessed to know a number of animal professionals in northeast Indiana to whom I can refer clients and ask questions.

3. Your relationships will improve.

Listening opens doors to a closer and happier relationship between you and your animal friend, but the benefit doesn’t stop there.

That’s because whatever you and your animal are facing almost certainly affects others, from your spouse to your horse’s trainer to the neighbor who mentioned your cat crying while you’re at work. As disconnected and polarized as we humans are, we live in a connected universe. Peace of mind in one arena translates to another. Who couldn’t use a little more of that these days?

To learn more about how animal communication and Reiki can help your animal friend — and you — visit me at www.njcrowe.com.

Science-based horsemanship comes to Fort Wayne

Mustang science based horsemanship animal Reiki animal communication
Geronimo, a mustang I’ve worked with for several years, was the star of the show in a science-based horsemanship demo with West Taylor in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

I caught a snippet of West Taylor’s science-based horsemanship seminar this weekend at Summit Equestrian Center here in Fort Wayne. Geronimo, a formerly wild mustang who trained at West’s Utah ranch last winter, was the star of the show for a Saturday demo.

Geronimo, with whom I’ve worked in my animal Reiki and animal communication practice, did a great job! Over the last few years, we’ve shared many a Reiki session — often while he was in horse time-out — and some good talks. Moment to moment, he’s had to decide that connecting and learning were worth the risk.

So I especially loved hearing from West about teaching horses to find and keep their center despite “trash-talking Tweety birds” and other threats. It’s about responding rather than reacting, which of course is something I have to work on myself.

I hear more trash talk from squirrels than birds, actually … but the point remains.

Suspicious minds (and noses): Jealous dogs

Photo by LUM3N on Pixabay

A University of California study gives scientific credence to what we’ve known all along: Dogs get jealous.

The 2014 study by Christine R. Harris and Caroline Prouvost found that when their owners displayed affection toward an animatronic stuffed dog that barked, whined, and wagged its tail, the dogs snapped at and pushed against the stuffed dog and tried to get between it and their human.

The 36 dogs were videotaped at their homes while their owners ignored them and interacted with a series of three objects: the stuffed dog, a children’s book, and a plastic jack-o-lantern.

The study looked only at small-breed dogs such as corgis, pugs, and dachshunds, apparently so the dogs would be easier to control if things got out of hand. One of my favorite sayings is, “The smaller the dog, the bigger the attitude,” but I’ve seen dogs of every size, breed, and temperament get their noses out of joint over having to compete for a human’s attention.

The dogs in this study were much more miffed by the stuffed dog, and more specifically the human’s interactions with it, than they were by the person reading aloud from the book or showering attention on the pumpkin.

Being ignored in favor of an inanimate object is one thing. The interaction with something so doglike that its butt had to be sniffed (which 86 percent of the dogs in the study did) made the difference. The study was published in PLOS One, a peer-reviewed online scientific journal.

So, how much of a problem is canine jealousy? Relatively little snapping was reported on the part of the dogs in this study. Since dogs are not inclined to hold grudges, it’s reasonable to assume that the next time you encounter the phrase “jealous rage,” it will not apply to a dog’s behavior.

Still, there is an important reminder here for maintaining a more just and happy household: There’s no substitute for one-on-one time.

If a friend’s dog is staying with us, Molly — our golden retriever/German shepherd/collie rescue with her share of issues — is fine with sharing her space and toys. But if my partner or I pet the guest dog, Molly wedges herself between us. This is when I make sure Molly gets just as much attention and lap time (yes, my 60-pound dog thinks she’s a lapdog) as she normally does. This makes her feel more secure and lets the visitor know where he stands.

It’s also not unusual for animals to feel threatened by the arrival of a new four-legged family member. Every time an animal joins or leaves a household or herd, that small civilization shifts. The rules and hierarchies are reset.

This is especially true for cats, whose independence and territorial nature does not preclude forming strong bonds with other animals and humans. Spending some one-on-one time, even if it’s just a few minutes a day of play, walking, or snuggling, with each animal will help everyone (including you) feel fully loved and appreciated.

Of course, thanks to the power of the canine nose, a potential rival need not be present to  merit suspicion. When I go home after an in-person animal Reiki session or my rounds at Summit Equestrian Center, I can count on a thorough sniff-over from Molly. She gathers all kinds of data about where I’ve been and with whom.

While she doesn’t entirely approve, generally within a few minutes she’s ready to move on to something else — going outside, angling for a treat, or making sure the UPS man knows the premises are protected. I still make sure she knows that even though I have been out working with other dogs (and cats, horses, pigs, sheep, etc.), I am happy to see her.

Like our previous dog, Ellie, Molly also has a knack for coming into the room and settling beside me when I’m sending distant Reiki energy to an animal, especially another dog. She doesn’t mind … but she doesn’t want to be left out, either. Fortunately, there is always enough Reiki to go around.