The horse deserves a heads up

Image by Bee Iyata from Pixabay 

The horse didn’t know he was moving that day, let alone why. He didn’t know what awaited him at the end of that trailer ride.

With each attempt to coax him down the ramp, he panicked more. Once the humans finally got him off the trailer and into a pen, he ran back and forth, stopping every so often to whinny.

Change may be for the best, even life-saving. The horse still deserves to know what’s happening.

Here are two things to consider if you are moving, re-homing, selling, or rescuing a horse:

1. You set the tone.

Your horse already knows something’s up. How you handle it matters more than you think.

Tell the animals you’re all moving to a great new home. Let the horse know she’s going to live with someone who can care for her better than you can right now, or where you think she’ll be happier. Picture the trailer ride, the new home, the new owner and friends, even the temporary safe space. Tell the animals who will stay behind what’s happening, too.

If you are moving a horse for rescue or evacuation, stay as calm as possible. Let him know his safety is your priority and he can help by trusting you … even just a tiny bit.

2. Help is available.

Fellow horse owners can be great sources of support whether you need to borrow something or you’re dealing with some major manure.

I can help by communicating the situation to your horse and listening to what he needs. I can support him, you, and the other animals with Reiki, a wonderful stress reduction modality. Both of these also work from a distance and can bring greater peace of mind to even the hardest transitions. Visit www.njcrowe.com for more information.

Most importantly: If you are having trouble caring for your animals, please reach out to your vet or a reputable rescue or animal welfare agency. They’d rather help you now than deal with a more serious situation down the road.

Talk before you walk

Image by MabelAmber from Pixabay

In my corner of the world, walks and dog park visits get a lot more frequent and fun in March. This year in particular, I think we’re especially eager to get out, charge ahead, and get past all that’s held us back. So it’s all the more important to get the season off to a good start.

Before you grab the leash or even spell the W word, calmly sit or stand with your dog. Picture what the two of you are going to do — putting on the leash/halter, going to the dog park, walking down the sidewalk in your own neighborhood — and how you expect him to behave. It’s important to picture what you do want (keeping his attention on you, for example) instead of any behavior you don’t want.

Check out these good-citizen tips. Don’t feel like clicking? I understand. Here are the basics: Pick up your dog’s poop, keep him leashed and close to you, and prevent him from injuring other animals or people.

If you do experience problems, even and especially if someone else brings them to your attention, please don’t hesitate to work with a trainer. There’s no shame or judgment, only a desire to improve the quality of life for your dog, you, and anyone you may encounter. A good trainer can do wonders, especially if you get a referral from someone you trust. It’s really never too late to make a positive change for both you and your dog.

I’m happy to help, too! Both Reiki and animal communication can be very useful in resolving behavioral issues, easing transitions, and giving animals and their people a “reset” during stressful times.

Enough to go around … really?

Three cats, one lap. How’s that going to work?

I told the them there was enough Reiki, and enough love, to go around.

At first I didn’t think they believed me. It is, admittedly, a line we hear when “enough” seems like not nearly enough. But they worked out the logistics for themselves. The tabby stayed put, the black cat sat on my shins, and the calico decided it was more fun to stay on the counter and swat. We all settled in for the session, just as it was.

Then there was the horse who gently nudged his chicken friend when he decided he’d shared enough of his grain. She took it in stride and moved on. No biting, no squawking. 

All living beings compete for resources. We see our animals get jealous. Yet when we build even a little more trust in ourselves and one another, “enough” can look very different.